The Organic Traveller
Sunday, 23 April 2017

Salzburg: Organic ice-cream

To my knowledge there is no such thing as a fully organic ice-cream parlour in town, but as long as you are in the city center the next place offering decent artisanal ice-cream made from organic milk is just a short walk away.

The easiest bet, with several shops both, north and south of the river Salzach, is a local chain dubbed Icezeit, preferring fairly traded and sustainably grown ingredients. Creamy, and with a mouth-watering selection of flavours ranging from the usual suspects to greek honey yogurt or peanut caramel, this ice-cream is hard to resist. Avoid the (additional) toppings you can buy on top as none of them are organic. During the warm season they also have a frozen yogurt shop opposite the ice-cream parlour in Kaiviertel near Residenzplatz where you pay by weight.

All Icezeit shops keep open longer than given below when outside temperatures are high while you may find them closed on extremely bad weather days. In the case of the latter opt for Cafe Timeless a few steps off Linzergasse pedestrian area where no such restrictions appear.

Extremely tasty frozen yogurt throughout the year can be had at Fabi's Frozen Bio Yogurt located within the building of Mozart's birthplace at Universitätsplatz. This clean, no-frills ice-cream parlour uses organic milk for their plain and passion fruit varieties. Unfortunately the organic promise in the name of the place is restricted to the frozen yogurt itself. Neither the toppings (with a notable exception of the caramelized nuts) nor the coffee sold here are organic. The yogurt comes in small, medium and large sizes, always in cardboard cups with a plastic spoon. So even if you choose to sit down on one of their tables you cannot avoid waste.

If you insist on 100 percent organic ice-cream pay a visit to Organic Pizza Salzburg near Mirabellplatz. They do not offer a cone to go here but the ice-cream is locally produced by a long-established organic ice-cream maker.

Ceased to exist

The following places do no longer exist, even though you still might find references to them on the web:

Tuesday, 18 April 2017

Salzburg: Organic restaurants, eateries, and cafes

Fast food

When you're hungry and don't know where to go head for the Bio-Burgermeister in the middle of busy Linzergasse pedestrian street. With its liberal opening hours (no closing day, open until 10 pm) and central location this no-frills burger grill is serving both, meat, vegetarian, and vegan versions, purely made with organic ingredients. The service is swift, the burgers and side-dishes fresh, crisp and tasty, and most of the soft drinks and the beer are organic, too (though you have to check the bottles for organic labelling). The hot varieties I would describe as spicy rather than hot, and they come up with interesting seasonal versions like the pumpkin burger with a pumpkin patty.

Unfortunately the place has implemented bad habits of conventional fast-food places, too: It produces a lot of waste since the meals are served on cardboard one-way plates, and the staff isn't actually busy cleaning the tables, or refilling paper towels.

Austrian

For the weekday lunch meat lovers have another option: home-made local food at the Stadtimbiss, a traditional butcher's shop. The meat is organic, but it is up to the guest to enquire about the remaining ingredients.

When I tried to find a restaurant serving local dishes links on the web lead me to "Hirschenwirt" which turned out to have been reconverted into a conventional place. Its current publican however was so nice to point me to two places which I'll present here although I did not have time to visit them personally.

Urbankeller seems to be a nice address for a rustic meal accompanied by live acts -- rock, jazz or experimental theatre -- and local organic beer or wine. Although the place is certified by Bio Austria not everything is organic. Organic dishes (alongside vegan and vegetarian options) however are clearly marked on the menu. Opening hours are limited to Wednesday through Sunday.

Another Bio Austria certified place combining cultural events (namely occasional small stage theatre) and culinary art is the Schützenwirt in Sankt Jakob am Thurn, a place to visit in combination with a day out in the countryside. Contrary to Urbankeller all dishes are 100 percent organic, but you have to be prepared to do without your mobile due to missing coverage.

Indian

Back in town, vegetarian fusion food with roots in the Indian cuisines has been served for almost 20 years at Spicy Spices. This pleasant eatery keeps open all days until 9:30 pm. No place for the romantic dinner but nice for a chat with friends, accompanied by a healthy lunch, a coffee, chai and/or cake, all organic. You can also shop for their home-made spice mixtures, chutneys and pickles which make tasty gifts.

International

The second surviving organic restaurant of old, too, draws its inspiration from the subcontinent and East-Western fusion. The Heart of Joy is a vegetarian (vegan friendly), predominantly organic cafe cum eatery run by followers of Sri Shinmoy. The latter is openly presented which may not be your idea of the perfect surroundings for a recreational sip of coffee or an Italian, Austrian, oriental or Indian inspired lunch in this otherwise pleasant location. Students are entitled a ten percent discount, and breakfast on weekends is being served all day.

For a simple lunch or a piece of home-made organic cake you may also try the A* bar in nearby Auerspergstraße.

Italian

Arguably the city's best pizza can be had when entering a non-descript entrance on Franz-Josef-Straße south of Paris-Lodron-Straße: Here you find a place boringly dubbed Organic Pizza Salzburg, and this is exactly what it is: A totally unpretentious venue serving glorious 100% organic pizza in six vegetarian, three vegan and one omnivore varieties, all well worth their 9.80 to 16.80 EUR. Instead of the standard base made from wheat you may order one made with spelt. Choose your drinks from the fridge (most, but not all organic), and have a home-made organic and vegan cake with fairly traded ingredients and/or a locally produced ice-cream to end your meal. No frills, just love, and in contrast to other fast food places covered here you will be served on real plates instead of paper waste. Unfortunately the place is closed on Mondays and Sundays.

Coffee

For the real coffee thing head for Röstzimmer 15 a few meters from "Spicy Spices". A cosy living room serving artisanal (though not necessarily organically certified) chocolates and pastries with Ethiopian organic coffee roasted in the room next door.

If you prefer ice-cream or frozen yogurt for dessert see here.

Closed or no longer organic

2017-04-18 17:00:05 [The_Conscious_Traveller, Austria, Salzburg, organic, lunch, dinner, takeaway, restaurant, cafe, eatery, coffee, ice-cream, fastfood, vegetarian, vegan, Indian, burgers, pizza] link

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This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.

Friday, 14 April 2017

Salzburg: Hotels serving organic breakfast

When I visited Salzburg ten years ago we were delighted to find romantic boutique hotel Wolf-Dietrich in the Altstadt neighbourhood, then a certified Bio Hotel. Tempi passati -- in 2016 the only reminder of this time was a partially organic breakfast with organic cheese, yoghurt, tea, and fair-trade coffee. Bread, eggs and milk are of local origin, but may or may not be organic.

A disappointing experience, but fortunately I found more promising options during my recent visit to Mozart's place of birth: Hotel & Villa Auersperg is just a few corners away, a Bio Austria certified, family-driven, family-friendly place serving an about 95 percent organic breakfast buffet. When it comes to the contents of the mini-bar and the complimentary selection of tea and herbal tea on the room I was delighted to discover that all sweet and savoury snacks were organic, you only have to check on the teas and refreshments. Other pleasant surprises: the shampoo and liquid soap are organic and produced by a manufactury in town, the towels are washed with ecological detergents, and the complimentary good-night chocolate on the bed are organic and fairly traded.

The hotel also has a gastro bar cum cafe dubbed A* bar where you can have home-made organic soups and cakes, partially organic snacks, sandwiches, sweets, coffee as well as organic wines, teas and juices. Its small, yet carefully selected daily menu caters for vegans, vegetarians, and omnivores alike, with generous servings. With the relaxed atmosphere of a mundane hotel bar the place is also worth a visit when you're not staying at the hotel. Their assortment of spirits for a relaxed drink at the bar however does not include organic ones as far as I could see. The kitchen closes around 22:30 pm.

Last but not least the hotel which consists of two spacious adjacent houses (the "hotel" and the "villa") is driven in accordance with the Economy for the Common Good principles. The only disappointment: What could be a pleasant park in the backyard of the villa (and certainly was a garden once upon a time) is an embarassing parking lot for guests. This is also the place to fetch a bicycle for a city ride.

About ten minutes out of the city center, in the neighbourhood of Maxglan, you will find another Bio Austria certified retreat, the Green Hotels member Hotel Zur Post. Here as well you will be served a fully organic breakfast.

2017-04-14 18:00:01 [The_Conscious_Traveller, Austria, Salzburg, organic, hotel, accommodation] link

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This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.

Sunday, 09 April 2017

Munich: Organic Ice-cream

Every organic supermarket big enough to be equipped with a freezer will sell you iced-lollies or pre-packaged cups of ice-cream, at least during the warm season. But for the real thing you need to know where to find your small scale artisanal organic ice-cream parlour. Fortunately there are sufficient options to check out for your favourite, unfortunately none of them serves their fare in organic cones.

Arguably the best ice-cream in town is made by former shoe-pusher Thomas Bartu and his crew in Schwabing. Just like the best ice-cream parlours in Italy they cover their 24 types of ice-cream hygienically instead of displaying them for show-off. All ingredients are listed on big and nicely layouted wallpapers, leaving no questions open for vegans or people with allergies. Children pay less for the scoop than adults. You can also have a good (though not organic) cup of Italian-style coffee or an organic soft-drink, and have a yummy organic pizza. If you haven't had enough you can choose from an ever changing selection of Bartu ice-creams to take away in reusable containers. And the best: They don't close their shop during the cold season. On the other hand don't count on opening hours longer than the regular 10 pm.

Where would you expect organic and vegan ice-cream to go if not in the university quarter? A two-minutes walk from the Northern exit of the tube station "Universität" in the Maxvorstand neighbourhood you'll find IceDate serving date and cashew-based ice-cream varieties. I prefer their strong flavours like chocolate-ginger, chocolate-mint or wild berries; the more subtle ones like peanut or nectarine still need polishing. During their winter break (ending in April) their ice-cream can be had in in small cardboxes from Cafe Katzentempel. A scoop goes for 2.20 EUR, and every serving is topped with a small quantity of an additional flavour. Bad weather is no issue since they have a pleasant indoors sitting area.

A little further north there's also a traditional Italian ice-cream parlour near Elisabethplatz square: Trampolin.All of their dairy ice-creams are made with organic milk. Apart from standard varieties like vanilla or chocolate they also offer less common flavours like guava or dried prunes and lavender, the scoop for 1.50 EUR. Unfortunately the place is closed from late autumn through spring, but on warm crowded summer evenings they often keep open significantly longer than the announced 10 pm. In addition to ice-cream they also sell Italian-style coffee.

In the neighbourhood of Haidhausen you have the choice of three possible targets: Cosy though buzzing Cafe Reichshof a five minutes brisk walk from Ostbahnhof station offers home-made ice-cream spring through early autumn, though you may be tempted to indulge yourself in one of their gorgeous cakes instead (or have both?) The stuccoed ceiling with a candelabra play well together with the wooden shelves of the bakery display, making for an inviting yet not overwhelming interior. During the warm season you may prefer to sit outside facing relaxing Bordeauxplatz. The cafe is the newest branch of Bäckerei Neulinger, an organic bakery with two older shops in the neighbourhood of Neuhausen where you can equally tempt yourself, though not on Sundays. Be prepared to queue on nice-weather days, but since the service is swift, efficient and friendly waiting will usually take shorter time than expected. The Neulinger's ice-cream season also ends in autumn. A scoop goes for 1.30 EUR, and since the shop participates in the Brot am Haken ("bread on the hook") campaign you may buy a coffee, ice-cream, bread or cake voucher for someone in need as you go. During the high season ice-cream to take away is occasionally sold in nice returnable preserving glasses, with a deposit of 2 EUR.

Less frequented and just around the corner of Rosenheimer Platz you will find tiny Cafe Plaisir serving organic crepes, cakes, cookies, tin soups and coffee drinks apart from usually eight types of ice-cream (1.20 EUR the scoop). During the cold season they have home-made chocolates, and you might ask for the one type of ice-cream still hidden away in the freezer. Be patient and kind if the serving personnel does not respond immediately -- the shop is a social enterprise run by longterm-unemployed persons.

If you fancy an ice-cream during your evening stroll head for fancy True & 12 opposite the Gasteig cultural center. Their milk comes from a family-run organic farm half an hour away by urban train (plus five minutes by bus plus half an hours walk), and other ingredients like hazelnuts and eggs are organic, too. All non-organic ingredients are of course all natural, and the result is lip-smacking delicious. They come up with interesting flavour combinations like lavender and cassis (dubbed "Haidhausen"), the scoop for 1.60 EUR, and for an additional euro it will occasionally be served in a hand-rolled cinnamon-flavoured cone, so ask for availability! To much regret also this place is closed from end of October to mid of March.

In Neuhausen organic ice-cream to go can also be had from Cafe Ruffini, described in my restaurant post.

The classical Italian ice-cream parlour -- ice-cream to go, and not much ado -- you'll find with Gelateria Artefredda in Giesing near Ostfriedhof on busy Tegernseer Landstraße. On the right-hand side of their display you have their organic varieties for 1.50 EUR the scoop -- about eight ones to choose from. The unpretentious eco-styled walls make it a light and pleasant place to have a short coffee break. Closed during the cold season, usually during November through March. On bad weather days they often open up to a quarter of an hour past their announced opening time, nice weather provided they will often keep open longer than announced.

If you happen to be on Viktualienmarkt during the warm season step by Beim Trübenecker, the organic grocery booth offering the best selection of organic fruit and greens on the market. On the Northern side of their booth facing Frauenstraße you can choose from six to eight fully organic, innovative and extremely palatable diary as well as vegan ice-cream varieties to go, made by an artesanal ice-cream maker in the vicinity of Munich. The scoop goes for 1.50 EUR.

In addition Munich hosts a franchise of the French-Italian ice-cream chain Amorino in the Karstadt department store's window front a few steps outside Hauptbahnhof. They claim to use organic eggs and otherwise only natural ingredients, and the ice-cream, though rather expensive, is indeed delicious and lovingly made into flower-shapes. The menu promises two certified organic sorbets (chocolate and a mixed citrus fruit variety).

If you happen to attend a street festival in Munich like the biannual Streetlife on Leopoldstraße or the annual Munich Sports Festival on Königsplatz watch out for a pink-blue food truck selling Cramer's Speiseeis in cones. The Cramers run a family-driven organic bakery cum pastry shop in Gauting near Munich, where they also make their ice-cream, so be brave when you're in the vicinity and give their spicy ginger or chocolate-chili varieties a try.

Ceased to exist

The following places do no longer exist, even though you still might find references to them on the web:

2017-04-09 18:45:00 [The_Conscious_Traveller, Munich, Haidhausen, Schwabing, organic, ice-cream, coffee, cafe, Italian] link

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This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.

Saturday, 01 April 2017

Munich: Organic supermarkets

Organic supermarkets can be found on almost every second corner in Munich as long as you happen to be in the "right" neighbourhood.

Apart from a local organic supermarket chain, Vollcorner (consisting of 15 markets in Munich and around), Munich hosts several branches of Germany's biggest organic chains, Basic (8 markets), Alnatura (14 markets in Munich and surroundings) and Denn's (10 markets in the greater Munich area, 7 within the city boundaries). In addition you will find a branch of a small regional chain, Landmann's, many small independent supermarkets, often equipped with a Biomarkt sign, and even some homely, surviving corner shops.

On weekdays all chains and most other supermarkets keep open between 9 am and 8 pm, Vollcorner and Basic markets open at 8 am. Saturday opening hours vary, the big retailers and Vollcorner close 8 pm. All groceries except the Biokultur supermarket in the basement of the central train station are closed on Sundays.

Apart from these full range retailers there is a local food only chain, Herrmannsdorfer, specialising in meat products and bakery items produced in the Herrmannsdorfer Landwerkstätten in Glonn, somewhat outside Munich.

Very few of the full retail outlets mentioned above offer food only; usually you will be able to buy toiletries and detergents, too -- some smaller independent markets making an exception.

In 2015 a branch of the hyped Italian Eataly delicatessen chain opened within the architectonically interesting glass and iron construction of Schrannenhalle near Viktualienmarkt. It's true, they offer a good range of organic products, and organic food items are labelled as such on the shelves, but it's nevertheless a disappointing experience: Almost no fresh organic fruit and veges (not even the fresh herbs are organic), only pre-packaged organic meat (forget about the well-assorted meat counter), and the organic wines and spirits in the basement are not marked "bio" on the shelves, so it's very hard to find them.

Independent full-retailers

If you want to support the local economy, both Vollcorner, Munich-based Basic and Herrmannsdorfer shops are all fine, but you may prefer to support independent markets where the owners are actually running the stores and create a homely and personal atmosphere. Often you will find products not on sale by the big chains.

When traditional Grüner Markt chain closed down end of September 2014, their main house in the Altperlach neighbourhood made an exception. Housed in a vault it has a pleasant italophilic, somewhat venerable atmosphere, definitely worth a visit. The perfect surroundings when shopping for delicatessen, and a must-go during the Christmas season. It's now dubbed Mohrhof Perlach.

The other big independent is Schmatz ("smack") in the Glockenbach neighbourhood, step by if only for the lovely decoration of their bodycare section. Kids are invited to play in an old-fashioned corner shop, and selected items are lovingly set on display.

For the pittoresque yet upmarket farmshop feeling in the city aim for Stemmerhof on top of the Sendlinger Berg. Once upon a time a wealthy village farm opposite the village church the nicely restored houses are now the home of an organic supermarket (as well as an organic fashion and toy store for smaller children dubbed Natur und Kind). Their butcher's cum delicatessen disk will happily sell lunch snacks to eat on the spot or to take-away. The same enterprise also runs a second branch in the suburb of Grünwald, just a street crossing opposite of Alter Wirt hotel and restaurant.

Clean, but not as hip and cosily-polished -- the shop was opened in 2000 -- is the Erdgarten supermarket a ten-minutes walk away from Pasing trainstation (or two minutes from Pasing Marienplatz square). Monday through Thursday from 12 am you can step by for an organic and vegetarian wholefood self-service lunch prepared by the Grüner Markt catering kitchen or a coffee break. They also have a nicely decorated bodycare section and -- to my knowledge -- are the only organic supermarket in Munich catering for knitters: They offer a nice selection of organic wool.

If you by chance happen to strand near the Klinikum Harlaching hospital, don't dispair: two tramstops in North-Eastern direction on the left side (just follow the tram line along Grünwalder Str.) you'll find Biowelt, a crammed independent organic supermarket with a suberb selection of frozen convenience products: All you need if visiting a friend or relative in the hospital in urgent need of a proper meal. Starting with lunch time they offer a helping of organic soup and a small selection of snacks. You may ask for a sandwich made on the spot.

Attending a conference at one of the huge Bogenhausen hotels near Effnerplatz? Your lunch break should be sufficient to follow Bülowstraße in Western direction to Herkomerplatz. Here you'll find not only a Herrmannsdorfer butcher's shop cum grocery cum eatery and the Hofpfisterei bakery branch next to it, but also a pleasant family-owned organic supermarket dubbed Biovolet. The Riemensberger family placed some bar tables in the entrance area to have a snack, and there is a second branch in Eching (formerly a Grüner Markt branch). Pay with your EC (VPay) debit card, and they donate a few cent to the BioBoden co-operative which buys farm land in order to lease it to organic farmers. On Thursdays you will receive a 10 percent discount if your shopping cart is worth more than 50 euros.

A short walk from the shores of the river Isar near the Southern end of the island housing the Deutsches Museum into the neighbourhood of Au you will find Auryn, one of the first organic supermarkets in town which took over the premises of a conventional one. The shopping area has diminished since, and so has the superstore feeling in favour of a personal, homely atmosphere. In 2016 a young team took over from the previous shopkeeper and has put a lot of effort into refurbishing the then somewhat worn location. They opened a vegan snack bar cum cafe facing Ohlmüllerstraße where you can sit down in cinema chairs for lunch or coffee.

By 2016 the first wrapping free supermarket has made it into town: Check the zero-waste post for a review of the Ohne shop in Maxvorstadt.

Closed down

The following organic supermarkets do no longer exist although you will still find references to them on the web:

2017-04-01 15:00:00 [The_Conscious_Traveller, Munich, Bogenhausen, Haidhausen, Maxvorstadt, organic, supermarkets, lunch, snacks, deli, Italian] link

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This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.