The Organic Traveller
Sunday, 12 November 2017

Salzburg: Hotels serving organic breakfast

When I visited Salzburg ten years ago I was delighted to find romantic boutique hotel Wolf-Dietrich in the Altstadt neighbourhood, then a certified Bio Hotel. Tempi passati -- in 2016 the only reminder of this time was a partially organic breakfast with organic cheese, yoghurt, tea, and fair-trade coffee. Bread, eggs and milk are of local origin, but may or may not be organic.

A disappointing experience, but fortunately I found more promising options during my recent visit to Mozart's place of birth: Hotel & Villa Auersperg is just a few corners away, a Bio Austria certified, family-driven, family-friendly place serving an about 95 percent organic breakfast buffet. When it comes to the contents of the mini-bar and the complimentary selection of tea and herbal tea on the room I was delighted to discover that all sweet and savoury snacks were organic, you only have to check on the teas and refreshments. Other pleasant surprises: the shampoo and liquid soap are organic and produced by a manufactury in town, the towels are washed with ecological detergents, and the complimentary good-night chocolate on the bed are organic and fairly traded.

The hotel also has a gastro bar cum cafe dubbed A* bar where you can have home-made organic soups and cakes, partially organic snacks, sandwiches, sweets, coffee as well as organic wines, teas and juices. Its small, yet carefully selected daily menu caters for vegans, vegetarians, and omnivores alike, with generous servings. With the relaxed atmosphere of a mundane hotel bar the place is also worth a visit when you're not staying at the hotel. Their assortment of spirits for a relaxed drink at the bar however does not include organic ones as far as I could see. The kitchen closes around 22:30 pm. Due to reconstruction work the A* bar will be closed January, 7 through March, 4 2018. During the first part of this period, i.e. through February, 18, French breakfast will be served on the room as the breakfast room will be closed.

Last but not least the hotel which consists of two spacious adjacent houses (the "hotel" and the "villa") is driven in accordance with the Economy for the Common Good principles. The only disappointment: What could be a pleasant park in the backyard of the villa (and certainly was a garden once upon a time) is an embarassing parking lot for guests. This is also the place to fetch a bicycle for a city ride.

About ten minutes out of the city center, in the neighbourhood of Maxglan, you will find another Bio Austria certified retreat, the Green Hotels member Hotel Zur Post. Here as well you will be served a fully organic breakfast.

In the Eastern neighbourhood of Parsch you may try the Heffterhof, another Salzburg hotel emphasizing on local, predominantly organic supplies in their kitchen. It has a focus as a conference hotel and offers fully organic breakfast. Let me know about your experience when you stay there.

If you read my post on eating out in Salzburg you might be wondering whether the Hotel Stadtkrug in Linzergasse was offering (partially) organic breakfast. Unfortunately this is not so.

2017-11-12 13:45:00 [Salzburg, organic, hotel, accommodation, breakfast] link

Creative Commons Licence
This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.

Friday, 03 November 2017

Sustainable shopping in Salzburg

To shop for organic products in Salzburg couldn't be easier: Even the random conventional supermarket has a sufficient selection of it, hence availability is not an issue as long as you are familiar with the EU and the Austrian organic logos (mainly the AMA organic seal, the Austria organic guarantee, and the Bio Austria certificate). When thinking gifts and souvenirs, visits to the flagship stores of Austria's main organic brands come in handy: Salzburg hosts plenty of them, all located within walking distance in the city center. Here's a selection, all of them committed not only to organic but fairly traded products:

Name Salzburg, and the famous Mozartkugel chocolates comes to mind. I couldn't find an organic version, but a stroll to the Zotter confectioner's shop will lead you directly to a sweet paradise, with myriads of surprising declinations of artisanal chocolates, among others special Salzburg chocolate truffles ("Salzburger Nockerln").

Not so sweet teeth should head for busy Linzer Gasse pedestrian street to find teas, tisanes, dried herbs and spices, as well as a selection of sweets and natural body care at Sonnentor -- the contemporary version of a medieval chemist's shop, with an abundance of products based on herbs grown in Austria itself.

Just a stone's throw away you will find Weltladen, a dedicated fair trade shop and a nice place to shop for all kind of gifts -- both eatable, wearable, and decorative.

If you feel like a coffee during your shopping spree step by Röstzimmer 15, a small scale coffee roaster's specialising in organic fairly traded traditionally grown Ethiopian coffee dubbed "Urkaffee". In addition they sell organic chocolates, tea, and honey from within the city boundaries. Careful with the bread: only a selection is organic. Unfortunately this cosy little shop is closed on Saturdays (and Sundays).

Once home to a vibrant shoe industry there's not much left of artisanal shoemakery in today's Austria. If it wasn't for the "Waldviertler" -- robust enduring footwear which you can buy at Gea alongside fashionable leather bags, sustainably made furniture with a sometimes anarchistic touch, bedding, eco fashion accessoires, organic tea and tisanes, or gift items. The company is a major driving force within the Economy for the Common Good movement, and all products are made in sustainably driven, socially conscious workshops by artisans in Austria and its neighbouring countries.

For sustainably produced shoes of play- and colourful designs -- light city wear in contrast to the down-to-earth design inspired by the farm lands of the Waldviertel -- head to the Think! flagship store in the old town. The founder of this brand also comes from an Austrian shoemaker family, and the company is headquartered in a small Upper Austrian village, Kopfing.

While Gea provides you with socks, gloves, scarfs, gloves and other textile accessoires it's not a clothes boutique. For eco fashion you may try Bella Boutique in Linzer Gasse, but check the labels carefully as its entrance area shows off tourist rip-off like cheap Chinese down jackets made from 100% plastic materials. The shop was formerly located in Wolf-Dietrich-Straße, an address you still may come across.

If you love hemp and other re-discovered plant-based fibres head for Eberlin-Frenkenberger Naturmode in Dreifaltigkeitsgasse, a nice fashion boutique with a classical approach.

Closed

2017-11-03 17:00:00 [Salzburg, organic, fair, coffee, tea, gifts, spices, fashion, shopping] link

Creative Commons Licence
This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.

Thursday, 02 November 2017

Salzburg: Organic ice-cream

To my knowledge there is no such thing as a fully organic ice-cream parlour in town, but as long as you are in the city center the next place offering decent artisanal ice-cream made from organic milk is just a short walk away.

The easiest bet, with several shops both, north and south of the river Salzach, is a local chain dubbed Icezeit, preferring fairly traded and sustainably grown ingredients. Creamy, and with a mouth-watering selection of flavours ranging from the usual suspects to greek honey yogurt or peanut caramel, this ice-cream is hard to resist. Avoid the (additional) toppings you can buy on top as none of them are organic. During the warm season they also have a frozen yogurt shop opposite the ice-cream parlour in Kaiviertel near Residenzplatz where you pay by weight.

All Icezeit shops keep open longer than given below when outside temperatures are high while you may find them closed on extremely bad weather days. In the case of the latter opt for Cafe Timeless a few steps off Linzergasse pedestrian area where no such restrictions appear.

Extremely tasty frozen yogurt throughout the year can be had at Fabi's Frozen Bio Yogurt located within the building of Mozart's birthplace at Universitätsplatz. This clean, no-frills ice-cream parlour uses organic milk, both for the frozen yogurt and for Italian-style coffee drinks. In addition to the plain yogurt they occasionally have a passion fruit variety. Unfortunately the organic promise in the name of the place is restricted to the milk. Neither the toppings (with a notable exception of the caramelized nuts) nor the coffee sold here are organic. The yogurt comes in small, medium and large sizes, always in cardboard cups with a plastic spoon. So even if you choose to sit down on one of their tables you cannot avoid waste, in fact you pay less when taking away your coffee drink in a one-way coffee cup.

If you insist on 100 percent organic ice-cream pay a visit to Organic Pizza Salzburg on Franz-Josef-Straße. They do not offer a cone to go here but the ice-cream is locally produced by a long-established organic ice-cream maker.

Ceased to exist

The following places do no longer exist, even though you still might find references to them on the web:

Monday, 30 October 2017

Hamburg: Organic Altona and Ottensen

Leaving the train at Altona station does not bring you to the heart of the city but to the vibrant neighbourhoods of Altona (to the East) and Ottensen (to the West) offering a great choice of lively (partially) organic places. None of them are very posh as the distinguished bourgeouis citizens usually live and roam elsewhere, and there's a good chance to mingle with locals.

Where to stay

As long as you are satisfied with a basic yet clean and well-kept hotel room head for the Schanzenstern. The name derives from its original location in the Sternschanze neighbourhood, but even though the hostel moved to its current location surely ten years ago references to its old address haven't vanished from the net completely. Most rooms are equipped with bunk beds, and you are well advised to book in advance especially if not travelling alone. The entire building is painted in clear basic colors, orange and blue the rooms, yellow the hallway. Since rain water is used for flushing the toilets its colour can be explained easily, and the soap dispensers in the bathroom are filled with liquid organic hand wash. If you're travelling by bicycle there's a locked shed where you can store it safely overnight.

The hostel's 100% organic breakfast buffet keeps open daily from 7:30 to 10:30, but is not included in the price for the night. For 8 additional Euro you can order it until late on the evening before. The restaurant also serves organic lunch on weekdays, and there are board games and journals to spend the time with.

Bakeries

Breakfast and lunch alternatives are located within five-minutes walking distance: For one there's the Zeit für Brot ("time for bread") artisanal show bakery next to a branch of the Denn’s organic supermarket chain in Ottenser Hauptstraße. Through a window you can watch the bakers at work, and buy German bread fresh from the oven. If stepping by for a coffee or another non-alcoholic drink, a pastry, cake, savoury snack, or a light lunch (all organic) queue with the other customers and place your order at the till. Find a place at one of the tables inside or -- during the warm season -- outside under a sunshade also sheltering from the occasional rain shower and enjoy the gorgeous smell of real bread together with your snack.

Cafes and lunch restaurants

Another organic breakfast alternative is cosy cafe Lillisu offering 100% organic food and drinks. In addition to breakfast the women owners also serve sandwiches, filled pasta, spaghetti, soup and salads for lunch, both vegetarian and omnivore, prepared in the tiny kitchen in view of their guests. Place your order at the counter and add a home-made cake from the display. You'll be served but are expected to return to the counter for payment. Set breakfast plates are served on weekends only. Decorated in pastel colours this is also the place to buy nostalgic presents and some organic delicatessen (chocolates, olive oil, coffee, ...) as well as "Glück in Gläsern" ("happiness in jars"), (in)famous 100% non-organic nostalgic sweets many Germans will remember from their childhood, sold by the piece. As in the Schanzenstern restaurant a selection of magazines from Hamburg-based publishers are there to be read by the guests.

If your budget calls for a cheap lunch you may head for the uninspiring self-service restaurant on the first floor of the IKEA branch in Altona. On their website they do not announce organic food, but when I was there they offered two organically certified pasta dishes. If they do not have an organic dish when you visit or you would like to have an organic drink afterwards just walk a few steps in Eastern direction where you find yet another Denn's supermarket branch which also serves snacks at their self-service cafe.

Ice-cream

For a sweet threat head back to Altona train station (where you by the way will find another organic supermarket, this time an Alnatura branch). Since 1913 there has been an Italian ice-cream parlour in Ottenser Hauptstaße, which, after world war II became Eiscafe Venezia. Today, the owners are no longer of Italian origin, but use organic milk for all of their about 20 flavours. Unfortunately the ice-cream isn't fully organic itself; the scoop goes for 1.20 EUR. Usually the cafe closes at midnight, but you may find it closing earlier on bad weather.

More to try

Here's another organic cafe and a bakery I found during my research but did not have time to visit. I'll be happy if you'd share your impressions with me!

Closed

The following places do no longer exist although you might find them referenced on the web:

2017-10-30 10:00:07 [Hamburg, Altona, Ottensen, organic, coffee, ice-cream, supermarkets, grocery, eatery, lunch, breakfast, cafe, hotel, accommodation, bakeries] link

Creative Commons Licence
This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.

Thursday, 12 October 2017

Munich: Organic supermarkets

Organic supermarkets can be found on almost every second corner in Munich as long as you happen to be in the "right" neighbourhood.

Apart from a local organic supermarket chain, Vollcorner (consisting of 17 markets in Munich and around), Munich hosts several branches of Germany's biggest organic chains, Basic (8 markets), Alnatura (14 markets in Munich and surroundings) and Denn's (10 markets in the greater Munich area, 7 within the city boundaries). In addition you will find a branch of a small regional chain, Landmann's, many small independent supermarkets, often equipped with a Biomarkt sign, and even some homely, surviving corner shops.

Recently, both, Basic and Vollcorner, have made efforts to support zero-waste shopping.

On weekdays all chains and most other supermarkets keep open between 9 am and 8 pm, Vollcorner and Basic markets open at 8 am. Saturday opening hours vary, the big retailers and Vollcorner close 8 pm. All groceries except the Biokultur supermarket in the basement of the central train station are closed on Sundays.

Apart from these full range retailers there is a local food only chain, Herrmannsdorfer, specialising in meat products and bakery items produced in the Herrmannsdorfer Landwerkstätten in Glonn, somewhat outside Munich.

Very few of the full retail outlets mentioned above offer food only; usually you will be able to buy toiletries and detergents, too -- some smaller independent markets making an exception.

In 2015 a branch of the hyped Italian Eataly delicatessen chain opened within the architectonically interesting glass and iron construction of Schrannenhalle near Viktualienmarkt. It's true, they offer a good range of organic products, and organic food items are labelled as such on the shelves, but it's nevertheless a disappointing experience: Almost no fresh organic fruit and veges (not even the fresh herbs are organic), only pre-packaged organic meat (forget about the well-assorted meat counter), and the organic wines and spirits in the basement are not marked "bio" on the shelves, so it's very hard to find them.

Independent full-retailers

If you want to support the local economy, both Vollcorner, Munich-based Basic and Herrmannsdorfer shops are all fine, but you may prefer to support independent markets where the owners are actually running the stores and create a homely and personal atmosphere. Often you will find products not on sale by the big chains.

When traditional Grüner Markt chain closed down end of September 2014, their main house in the Altperlach neighbourhood made an exception. Housed in a vault it has a pleasant italophilic, somewhat venerable atmosphere, definitely worth a visit. The perfect surroundings when shopping for delicatessen, and a must-go during the Christmas season. It's now dubbed Mohrhof Perlach.

The other big independent is Schmatz ("smack") in the Glockenbach neighbourhood, step by if only for the lovely decoration of their bodycare section. Kids are invited to play in an old-fashioned corner shop, and selected items are lovingly set on display.

For the pittoresque yet upmarket farmshop feeling in the city aim for Stemmerhof on top of the Sendlinger Berg. Once upon a time a wealthy village farm opposite the village church the nicely restored houses are now the home of an organic supermarket (as well as an organic fashion and toy store for smaller children dubbed Natur und Kind). Their butcher's cum delicatessen disk will happily sell lunch snacks to eat on the spot or to take-away. The same enterprise also runs a second branch in the suburb of Grünwald, just a street crossing opposite of Alter Wirt hotel and restaurant.

Clean, but not as hip and cosily-polished -- the shop was opened in 2000 -- is the Erdgarten supermarket a ten-minutes walk away from Pasing trainstation (or two minutes from Pasing Marienplatz square). Monday through Thursday from 12 am you can step by for an organic and vegetarian wholefood self-service lunch prepared by the Grüner Markt catering kitchen or a coffee break. They also have a nicely decorated bodycare section and -- to my knowledge -- are the only organic supermarket in Munich catering for knitters: They offer a nice selection of organic wool.

If you by chance happen to strand near the Klinikum Harlaching hospital, don't dispair: two tramstops in North-Eastern direction on the left side (just follow the tram line along Grünwalder Str.) you'll find Biowelt, a crammed independent organic supermarket with a suberb selection of frozen convenience products: All you need if visiting a friend or relative in the hospital in urgent need of a proper meal. Starting with lunch time they offer a helping of organic soup and a small selection of snacks. You may ask for a sandwich made on the spot.

Attending a conference at one of the huge Bogenhausen hotels near Effnerplatz? Your lunch break should be sufficient to follow Bülowstraße in Western direction to Herkomerplatz. Here you'll find not only a Herrmannsdorfer butcher's shop cum grocery cum eatery and the Hofpfisterei bakery branch next to it, but also a pleasant family-owned organic supermarket dubbed Biovolet. The Riemensberger family placed some bar tables in the entrance area to have a snack, and there is a second branch in Eching (formerly a Grüner Markt branch). Pay with your EC (VPay) debit card, and they donate a few cent to the BioBoden co-operative which buys farm land in order to lease it to organic farmers. On Thursdays you will receive a 10 percent discount if your shopping cart is worth more than 50 euros.

A short walk from the shores of the river Isar near the Southern end of the island housing the Deutsches Museum into the neighbourhood of Au you will find Biochicco cafe and convenience store. Formerly dubbed Auryn it was one of the first organic supermarkets in town which took over the premises of a conventional one. The shopping area has diminished since, and so has the superstore feeling in favour of a personal, homely atmosphere. In 2016 a young team took over from the previous shopkeeper and has put a lot of effort into refurbishing the then somewhat worn location. They opened a vegan snack bar cum cafe facing Ohlmüllerstraße where you can sit down in cinema chairs for an organic lunch or coffee and home-made cake. The shop is the only supermarket I've seen so far printing its receipts on paper not containing bisphenol A plasticiser.

Crossing Ohlmüllerstraße and continuing south along Entenbachstraße you will bump into Entenbach Naturkost, an organic convenience store of old which is now driven by a young family. The location is clean and spacious, and at the same time preserves the homely atmosphere of small owner-run organic corner stores.

Waste-free supermarkets

By 2016 the first wrapping free supermarket made it into town: Check the zero-waste post for a review of the Ohne shop in Maxvorstadt.

Closed down

The following organic supermarkets do no longer exist although you will still find references to them on the web:

2017-10-12 17:00:00 [Munich, Bogenhausen, Haidhausen, Maxvorstadt, organic, supermarkets, lunch, snacks, deli, Italian] link

Creative Commons Licence
This work by trish is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For commercial use contact the author.